The Big Issue #237

  • November 24, 2015 to January 5, 2016
Africartoons (Brandan, Chip, Dr Jack & Curtis, Madam & Eve, Rico, Stent Yalo), Davin Andrew, Josie Borain, Colleen Brice, Jason Bronkhorst, Phiwokuhle Budaza, Retha Ferguson, Dave Gomersall, Eric Miller, Thulani Christopher Ntsong, Don Pinnock, Justin Sholk, Lynne Stuart, Lucy Stuart-Clark, Gavin Thompson, Louise Venter, Zapiro

The Big Issue #237 is on sale from vendors in Cape Town from November 24, 2015 to January 5, 2016. It costs R30 (R10 more than usual), but it’s thicker and comes with a supplementary guide to central Cape Town.

It’s a great Christmas stocking-filler and an even better read. And, of course, your chance to give our vendors a much-needed, well-deserved festive-season bonus.

BUY A DIGITAL COPY NOW!

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  • All
  • News

David Njove

David Njove describes himself as a family man. He’s happily married with five children  and three grandchildren.  He works hard to support his family, because he believes that one day they will support him.

She is Glorious

A feature from our 2015 Collector’s Edition. Dan Buchanan is haunted by South Africa, the love of her life.

The Rwandan student who hung on to her dream

Alice Wamundiya comes from a background where the importance of education is emphasised. When she settled in South Africa after her family fled the Rwandan genocide, […]

Old and on the street

Theresa Fisher was born in what was then Rhodesia, in 1950. Simon Jacobs was born in what was then Transkei, in 1957. Both of them have ended up, in 2015, begging on the same street corner in Rondebosch.

Going homeless for a good cause

This year, two Cape-based social enterprises, Youth Solutions Africa (YSA) and No Danger Diaries (NDD), will stage the Shelter Lockdown at the corner of Russel and […]

To market, to market

So you’re on leave for the first time in ages and there’s so much you want to do. But one thing you don’t feel like doing […]

Hawk-eyed: detecting childhood cancer

Parents rarely look for cancer in their children. But it happens, it’s serious, and recognising it early can make all the difference.

Introducing The Big Issue Gift Card

The Big Issue has just launched its gift card – in time for the giving season but available at any time of the year.

The 16 days of activism: what’s it all about?

In 1998, South Africa signed on to an international awareness drive called the 16 Days of Activism for No Violence Against Women and Children. Almost 20 […]

Under the skin of Albinism

For more than 20 years the Albinism Society of South Africa has supported people with albinism. Frances Aron finds out about a condition that’s often surrounded […]

My friend the Queen

When Freddie Mercury passed away in November 1991, the world lost an irreplaceable icon. But It’s A Kinda Magic!, a theatrical tribute show, offers fans a […]

The Cool Kids of Khayelitsha

Playlisted on many radio stations across the country and igniting stages in Cape Town, the Cool Kids are a Khayelitsha-based four-man crew combining DJ skills, music […]

Uncommon cool: from Delft to Los Angeles with a jazz trumpet

Opportunities are rare in marginalised Cape communities, where one talent after another tends to wither on an underprivileged vine.

Come dine with The Big Issue

On November 25, The Big Issue will host its final business breakfast for 2015, sponsored by and hosted at The Table Bay Hotel.

Online tool tackles domestic workers’ wages

Are you paying your domestic worker their fair share? Code for South Africa (Code4SA) has created a new app…

Having a blast?

Fireworks can be a lot of fun, but they can also be pretty dangerous. That’s why, with Guy Fawkes on November 5, the City of Cape Town has designated 12 sites for their use.

Hunters: Killers or saviours?

The oft asked question is: are trophy hunters protectors of biodiversity or are they heartless killers of defenceless wild animals? To make any headway with this question, we need to consider the following: Does hunting protect the wilderness?

Column: The moaner visa

Eugene Yiga’s excitement at travelling somewhere new turns into the realisation that he might be better off staying home.

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